DETENTION FACILITIES IN SANTA BARBARA COUNTY 1996-1997


FACILITY MANAGED BY LOCATION TYPE

SIZE

CARPINTERIA POLICE DEPT. SHERIFF'S DEPT. 5775 CARPINTERIA AVE.
CARPINTERIA 93013
HOLDING

3 CELLS

NEW CUYAMA SUBSTATION SHERIFF'S DEPT. 215 NEWSOME ST.
NEW CUYAMA 93254
HOLDING

1 CELL

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY MAIN JAIL SHERIFF'S DEPT. 4336 CALLE REAL
SANTA BARBARA 93110
TYPE II JAIL

657-1049 INMATES

SANTA BARBARA MUNICIPAL COURT SHERIFF'S DEPT. 118 E FIGUEROA ST. SANTA BARBARA 93101 COURT HOLDING

8 CELLS

SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT SHERIFF'S DEPT. 1105 SANTA BARBARA ST.
SANTA BARBARA 93101
COURT HOLDING

8 CELLS

SANTA MARIA BRANCH JAIL SHERIFF'S DEPT. 812 W FOSTER RD.
SANTA MARIA 93455
TYPE I JAIL

9 CELLS

SANTA MARIA MUNICIPAL COURT SHERIFF'S DEPT. 312 E COOK ST.
SANTA MARIA 93454
COURT HOLDING

12 CELLS

SANTA YNEZ VALLEY SUBSTATION SHERIFF'S DEPT. 1745 MISSION DR. SOLVANG 93463 HOLDING

1 CELL

MEN'S HONOR FARM SHERIFF'S DEPT. 4434 CALLE REAL SANTA BARBARA 93110 TYPE IV JAIL

257 INMATES

WOMEN'S HONOR FARM SHERIFF'S DEPT. 66 SAN ANTONIO RD.
SANTA BARBARA 93110
TYPE IV JAIL

36 INMATES

SANTA BARBARA SOBERING CENTER SANTA BARBARA POLICE DEPT. & `THRESHOLD TO RECOVERY' 17 E HALEY ST.
SANTA BARBARA 93101
HOLDING

1 CELL

GUADALUPE POLICE DEPT. CITY OF GUADALUPE 4490 10TH ST.
GUADALUPE 93434
HOLDING

1 CELL

LOMPOC POLICE DEPT. CITY OF LOMPOC 107 CIVIC CTR. PLAZA LOMPOC 93436 TYPE I JAIL

10 CELLS

SANTA BARBARA POLICE DEPT. CITY OF SANTA BARBARA 215 E FIGUEROA ST.
SANTA BARBARA 93101
HOLDING

2 CELLS

SANTA MARIA POLICE DEPT. CITY OF SANTA MARIA 222 COOK ST.
SANTA MARIA 93454
HOLDING

1 CELL

LOS PRIETOS BOYS' CAMP PROBATION DEPT. STAR ROUTE, PARADISE RD.
SANTA BARBARA 93105
JUVENILE FACILITY

56 IN DORMS

SANTA BARBARA JUVENILE HALL PROBATION DEPT. 4500 HOLLISTER AVE. GOLETA 93110 JUVENILE FACILITY

56 BEDS

SANTA MARIA JUVENILE HALL PROBATION
DEPT.
812 B W. FOSTER RD.
SANTA MARIA 93454
JUVENILE FACILITY

20 BEDS


OVERVIEW


INTRODUCTION

There are eighteen separate detention facilities, both juvenile and adult, operating in Santa Barbara County. While the Santa Barbara County Sheriff's Department is responsible for most of these facilities, others are under the auspices of the county Probation Department or municipal offices. The table on the preceding page lists each facility, its location, management, type, and size or capacity. For order and clarity, this report is divided into four sections according to type: A. Holding Facilities, B. Honor Farms, C. Juvenile Facilities and D. Jails.

In preparing this report, the Grand Jury was continually confronted with issues relative to the overcrowded conditions in our jail and juvenile halls. The problem of overcrowding is a well-known one, but is often addressed only in terms of building new facilities. While the Grand Jury agrees that this is a needed solution, it also writes this report to point out implications of overcrowding that are of grave concern.

Due to overcrowded conditions, potential liability and security risks exist in the extensive transporting of prisoners from their housing in one part of the county to their court appearances in another part of the county. Additionally, courts which do not have adequate holding facilities present security risks in the moving of prisoners to courtrooms.

Another concern is in the use of exterior diversion programs as referenced in the Juvenile Hall section of this report. Such programs should be options for prisoners who have a chance of profiting from such programs, not solutions to overcrowding. And, as exterior diversion programs grow, probation officers are adversely impacted with heavy caseloads.

Also, the types of inmates who are incarcerated in our jails and juvenile halls have changed as a result of overcrowding. Honor Farms now primarily house drug users, something that was disallowed in the past. If another jurisdiction has an outstanding warrant for someone in Santa Barbara County jurisdiction, the lack of detention space is so impacted that it may affect the number of such warrants which are acted upon. Detention facilities are filled with only the most violent and difficult cases. Not only does this affect community safety, it also affects staffing at detention facilities. Difficult cases stretch the resourcefulness of staff. Additionally, the time and energy which could be put towards staff and program development is not available when staff are consistently faced with the immediacy of challenges inherent in working in a facility which is consistently overcrowded with problem cases.

Finally, the Grand Jury notes that formulating policies which attempt to address the question of prevention becomes very difficult when the immediacy of overcrowding is such a dominant issue. Contributing factors, such as drugs and gang activity, are only
projected to grow worse. It is clear that those in positions of responsibility are aware of the problems and, indeed share the Grand Jury's concern; however, their concern has failed to yield solutions. The Grand Jury repeats its expression of grave concern if this pattern continues.

OBJECTIVE

The objective of this Grand Jury's report is to fulfill the mandate of the California Penal Code, Section 919 (b): "The grand jury shall inquire into the condition and management of the public prisons within the county."

APPROACH

Grand Jury members made one announced visit to each facility. Subsequent unannounced visits were made as deemed necessary. Additionally, Grand Jury members reviewed the most recent state inspection reports of the facilities in addition to the report commissioned by the Office of the County Administrator in 1993, "Justice Facilities Short Term Master Plan" by Jay Farbstein and Associates, Inc. The Grand Jury interviewed the director of each facility, various staff personnel, the Head of the Probation Department and the Santa Barbara County Sheriff.


A. HOLDING FACILITIES


INTRODUCTION

Holding facilities, by definition, are temporary. The California Board of Corrections defines a Holding Facility as a detention facility "used for the confinement of persons for 24 hours or less pending release, transfer to another facility, or appearance in court." There are no overnight stays, and food service requirements are minimal. The Holding Facilities inspected for this report are: Carpinteria Police Department, Guadalupe Police Department, Santa Barbara Police Department, Santa Maria Police Department, New Cuyama Substation, Santa Ynez Valley Substation, Santa Barbara Municipal Court, Santa Barbara Superior Court, Santa Maria Municipal Court, and the Santa Barbara Sobering Center. The lack of adequate facilities at Lompoc is also addressed.

OBSERVATIONS

Except for specifics noted below, the Grand Jury found no problems or insufficiencies either in the condition of the cells or the quality of the management at these facilities. Site specific observations are as follows:

Guadalupe Police Department - 4490 10th St. - Guadalupe, CA 93434

The holding facility is a barred and locked area located within a multipurpose room of the Police Department offices. In addition to being connected to city offices, the Police Department is immediately adjacent to a residential neighborhood and an elementary school. There is easy public access to the partially fenced police parking area . There are no security restrictions in place to prohibit unauthorized personnel from roaming freely through the area.

New Cuyama Substation - 215 Newsome St. - New Cuyama, CA 93254

The substation is a former private home which has been remodeled for its current use. The space for the holding cell is in the attached garage. At the time of the initial
inspection, the cell was not operable due to the lack of required plumbing fixtures, i.e. a toilet and a sink. The holding cell is now functional and the Grand Jury commends staff for this project.

Additionally, the Grand Jury toured the adjacent abandoned structure which housed the former sheriff's substation and other county offices. The building was not locked and power was still hooked up. There was debris scattered throughout and the general structural condition of the building showed evidence of severe damage such as settling and cracks in walls and floors. As a result of Grand Jury inquiry, a subsequent visit showed that the structure had been boarded up and power had been disconnected. A previous Grand Jury report noted concern regarding the condition of this property (1992-1993, p.48).

Lompoc Court Holding - 107 Civic Center Plaza - Lompoc, CA 93436

The Lompoc court makes use of cell space in the adjacent Lompoc Jail. Inmates who have court appearances in Lompoc are brought from the Main Jail in Santa Barbara and held temporarily. Two cells (one for males and one for females) are set aside in the jail. Transfer to the court is through police and public parking area, around the rear of the court building and into the jury deliberation room. The Grand Jury followed this route and observed personnel using the area for socializing and coffee. If a jury is using the deliberation room, inmates have to be escorted through the public lobby. There are no private rooms for attorney consultations.

The use of Lompoc courts increased in January 1997. Criminal cases formerly heard in the Solvang Municipal Court are now filed in Lompoc.

FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

COMMENDATION:
The Grand Jury commends all officers at the holding facilities. Facilities are staffed by professional, knowledgeable and helpful personnel. Those in custody are treated in a firm, caring and respectful manner. The citizens of Santa Barbara County and the municipalities involved are well served by these hard working and dedicated men and women.

AFFECTED AGENCIES:

1. Guadalupe City Council
2. Guadalupe Police Department
3. Lompoc City Council
4. Lompoc Police Department
5. Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors
6. Santa Barbara County Sheriff's Department
7. Santa Barbara Police Department
8. Santa Maria Police Department

FINDING 1: The lack of security at the Guadalupe Police Department parking area presents a potential hazard to police officers, detainees and vehicles. The area is open to the public and easily available to anyone who might have a reason to interfere with the smooth transfer of detainees. Personnel and vehicles are vulnerable to mischief or even violence.

RECOMMENDATION 1: The Guadalupe Police Department should request and the Guadalupe City Council should fund the purchase and installation of automatic security gates at the two entrances to the police parking area: the walkway from City Hall and the driveway from 10th Street.

AFFECTED AGENCIES:


1. Guadalupe City Council
2. Guadalupe Police Department

FINDING 2: The abandoned building adjacent to the New Cuyama Sheriff's Substation is an unnecessary structure. Any abandoned structure has potential to be a danger or an invitation to mischief. Additionally, it is an eyesore and an indication of neglect on a piece of public property.

RECOMMENDATION 2: The Grand Jury concurs with the Director of Public Works in response to the Grand Jury report of 1992-1993 that this building "should be demolished."(Grand Jury Response, Detention Facilities, May 5, 1993). The Public Works Department should follow up on its decision.

AFFECTED AGENCY:


1. Santa Barbara County Public Works Department
Response General Services Response

FINDING 3: There is a security risk involved in the procedures used to transfer inmates from the Lompoc Jail to court appearances in the Lompoc court building. The Grand Jury concurs with the Farbstein report finding that there is a need for court holding facilities in Lompoc (p.16-7). This need will only become greater and the security risk of more concern with the increased use of the Lompoc court following the January 1997 consolidation. Additionally, the lack of private space for attorney client consultation makes confidentiality difficult.

RECOMMENDATION 3: The Sheriff and the North County Court Administrator should establish a secure court holding facility and attorney conference space in Lompoc.


AFFECTED AGENCIES:


1. North Santa Barbara County Court Administrator
Response
2. Santa Barbara County Sheriff's Department
Response

 

B. HONOR FARMS


INTRODUCTION

The Men's Honor Farm and La Morada Women's Honor Farm are minimum security facilities with limited supervision of inmates. In general, only those inmates who are classified or re-classified as General Population (without serious mental, health or behavior problems) are eligible for these facilities. All inmates are classified at the Main Jail and interviewed by the Probation Department before being admitted to the Honor Farms. Approximately 10% of the interviewees do not meet the admission standards. There is a pretrial unit located at the male Honor Farm that houses unsentenced inmates. All inmates at La Morada have been sentenced. About 90% of the inmates finish their sentences at the Honor Farms. Those who do not are sent back to the Jail. Inmates can perform work for the county such as gardening and plumbing, or they may be in the Work Furlough Program which allows them to work at their regular jobs.

Men's Honor Farm - 4434 Calle Real - Santa Barbara, CA 93110

OBSERVATIONS

This facility has 257 beds. There are four large rooms with triple-tiered bunks. The inmates have access to TV, a gymnasium, and outside facilities (except for inmates who are pretrial). There are classes available in cooking, parenting, sex education, and General Education Diploma (GED) preparation. There are also drug and counseling programs and Twelve Step groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and Narcotics Anonymous (NA).

The facility is very clean, well-maintained and well-managed. Medical services are provided under a contract with Prison Health Services. Mental health services are provided by the county Mental Health Services Department.

Women's Honor Farm - 66 San Antonio Rd. - Santa Barbara, CA 93110

OBSERVATIONS

This facility has thirty-six beds. According to staff estimates, approximately 85% of the admissions are due to drugs, both selling and using. There is one full time drug and alcohol counselor as well as AA and NA groups. There are tutors available two hours per week for GED preparation. There is a separate portable classroom on the grounds for GED and other classes which include agriculture, gardening, self-esteem, health, and nutrition taught by faculty from Oxnard College. Each inmate has a work assignment. On the premises, these assignments include laundry, kitchen, yard work, and clean-up.

Outside of the facility there are assignments at the Food Bank, Catholic Charities and with California Department of Transportation.

The Women's Honor Farm is a very clean, well-maintained and well-managed facility. Medical services are provided under a contract with Prison Health Services. Mental health services are provided by the county Mental Health Services Department.
FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

COMMENDATION:
The Honor Farms are well-managed by efficient and caring staff. The Santa Barbara County Sheriff's Department is doing an excellent job maintaining the facilities and in providing excellent educational and counseling programs.

AFFECTED AGENCIES:

1. Santa Barbara County Sheriff's Department
2. Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors

C. JUVENILE FACILITIES

 

INTRODUCTION

This report applies to the juvenile detention facilities maintained by Santa Barbara County. State law permits each county to establish a juvenile hall for the detention of minors who are accused of law violations or who have been found to have committed violations of the law. Santa Barbara County operates juvenile halls in Santa Barbara and Santa Maria, in addition to Los Prietos Boys Camp.

OBSERVATIONS

The Santa Barbara and Santa Maria Juvenile Halls are temporary detention facilities for minors who are either awaiting disposition of their cases in court, or who have been committed by a judge.

The Grand Jury was given the following information by Probation Department staff in reference to Santa Barbara and Santa Maria Juvenile Halls for the period January 1 to October 31, 1996:

_ The ages of the juveniles in Santa Barbara Juvenile Hall range from 10 to 19 with an average of 15.7 years. This 9-year age span is an 80% increase over the previous year, indicating that younger children are now being incarcerated. The ages of the juveniles in Santa Maria Juvenile Hall range from 13 to 18 with an average of 15.7 years. This age span is the same as last year.

_ In Santa Barbara Juvenile Hall, females make up approximately 12% of the juveniles.
In Santa Maria Juvenile Hall, females make up approximately 10% of the juveniles.

_ Approximately 80% of the male juveniles in both facilities are gang members.

_ Approximately 66% of the juveniles are admitted to either of the Halls only one time and 33% are admitted more than once. Approximately 15% are admitted many times.

_ The average stay at the Santa Barbara facility is 19.49 days for males and 13 for females.
The average stay at the Santa Maria facility is 10 days for males and 4 days for .
females.

Staff at the two juvenile halls is headed by a Probation Manager who is in turn responsible to the Deputy Chief Probation Officer. In addition, at Santa Barbara Juvenile Hall there are: five Juvenile Institution Officers III, twenty-six Juvenile Institution Officers I and II, two Clerk Typists, one Probation Institution Supervisor and a food service worker. At Santa Maria Juvenile Hall the staff consists of: one Probation Institution Supervisor, four Juvenile Institution Officers III, seventeen Juvenile Institution Officers I and II and two clerk typists.

The juvenile detention facilities in Santa Barbara County are inadequate in size for the number of juveniles requiring incarceration. In fact, the number of secure rooms available for juvenile detainees has remained unchanged for twenty years while the number needed has risen sharply. The overcrowding of the juvenile detention facilities is complicated by the fact that there are fifty-six beds available in Santa Barbara Juvenile Hall, but only twenty beds available in Santa Maria Juvenile Hall even though the need is greater in North County because 66% of all bookings for juvenile crime occur in this area (see Appendices A & B). As a result, when North County Juvenile Hall is full, detainees are transported to Santa Barbara Juvenile Hall necessitating their return to Santa Maria when their presence is required for proceedings in Juvenile Court. More than one Probation Department staff member expressed concern about the risk involved in the repeated transportation of juveniles, particularly because there are occasional incidents of disruption on the vehicles. When this happens, the driver stops the vehicle and contacts the California Highway Patrol for help.

The juvenile halls in Santa Barbara County serve three purposes: to protect the public (i.e. keep dangerous juveniles off the streets);to punish juvenile offenders; and to secure a juvenile who is at risk of flight. However, the staff of the juvenile halls are aware that overcrowding of the facilities poses a danger not only to the juvenile inmates but also to the probation employees overseeing them. In order to keep overcrowding to a minimum, only the most violent offenders are incarcerated in the juvenile halls and three exterior programs have been established to accommodate those who have committed non-violent offenses such as burglary, joyriding, drug possession and weapons possession. The exterior programs, in ascending order of security, are :
1. Home Supervision
2. House Arrest
3. Electronic Monitoring
It should be emphasized that in the opinion of the probation staff, the exterior programs are a limited solution to handling the overflow from the Juvenile Halls. In interviews with the Grand Jury, staff members stressed that if a larger facility were available, the vast majority of offenders who are currently controlled on exterior programs would be held in detention. Staff also expressed concern that juveniles on exterior programs are potentially a serious threat to the community. The numbers of juveniles on exterior programs have increased significantly in the past six years, from 380 in 1990 to 802 through September of 1996. During the first nine months of 1996, 40% of all juveniles admitted to Juvenile Hall were sent home on extended programs. (See appendix C). In addition, for every juvenile admitted to Juvenile Hall either for detention or release on an extended program, another juvenile was released back into the community under parental care after counseling by probation staff.

Santa Barbara Juvenile Hall - 4500 Hollister Avenue, Santa Barbara, CA 93110

The capacity of Santa Barbara Juvenile Hall is 56. The majority of the detainees are from the North County because of that facility's inadequate capacity.

A scholastic program, in cooperation with the Santa Barbara County Education Office, is operated by three teachers. It is necessary to use the dining hall and recreation hall in addition to the classroom in order to accommodate all the classes.

Medical services are provided by an RN forty hours per week; a psychiatrist for two hours twice a week and an MD for two hours once a week for general intake and physical examinations.

Food services are provided by the Main Jail. Breakfast is served in the dining room, lunch (a sandwich and fruit) is eaten in the cell and dinner is provided in the dining room in shifts.

Six probation officers are on duty for each of the morning and afternoon shifts with a staff-to-inmate ratio of 1:10. An additional officer is on call if necessary in order to maintain the low ratio. There are three probation officers on the graveyard shift.

Santa Maria Juvenile Hall - 812 B West Foster Road, Santa Maria, CA 93454

The capacity of Santa Maria Juvenile Hall is 20. There is a courtroom within the facility where a Juvenile Court Commissioner conducts hearings. Juveniles who are housed in Santa Barbara Juvenile Hall because of the limited capacity of the Santa Maria facility must then be transported back to Santa Maria for court appearances.

A scholastic program, in cooperation with the Santa Barbara County Education Office, is staffed by one teacher.

Medical services are provided by an RN thirty-five hours a week and an MD for three hours twice a week. A mental health counselor is provided by the county twenty hours per week.

Food services are provided by arrangement with the Vocational Training and Rehabilitation Center in Santa Maria.

Five probation officers are on duty for the morning shift, four in the afternoon shift and two on the graveyard shift.

FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

COMMENDATION:
Without exception, the Grand Jury found the staff working in the juvenile halls to be enthusiastic, compassionate and conscientious in their duty despite working conditions which are less than ideal as a result of the age of the Halls.

AFFECTED AGENCIES:

1. Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors
2. Santa Barbara County Probation Department

FINDING 1: There is high potential for risk to life and property due to the extensive transporting of North County juveniles to their detention in Santa Barbara Juvenile Hall and then back to court appearances in Santa Maria Juvenile Hall.

RECOMMENDATION 1: In spite of the failure of Proposition 205 in the November 1996 election which would have provided funds for new jails and juvenile halls, the Probation Department and Board of Supervisors should work together to immediately formulate a plan to operate a new juvenile hall in the North County.

AFFECTED AGENCIES:


1. Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors
Response
2. Santa Barbara County Probation Department
Response

FINDING 2a: The exterior programs operated by the Probation Department are a limited solution to the inadequate size of the juvenile facilities. As a result, potentially dangerous juveniles are being released back into the communities of Santa Barbara County.

RECOMMENDATION 2a: Same as Recommendation 1.

AFFECTED AGENCIES:

1. Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors
Response
2. Santa Barbara County Probation Department
Response



FINDING 2b: The increasing number of juveniles on exterior programs is straining the limited staff resources of the Probation Department. In 1989 the ratio of probation officers to the number of juveniles on exterior programs was 1:10. It is now 1:25 (see Appendix C).


RECOMMENDATION 2b: The Probation Department should request and the Board of Supervisors should fund an increase in staff in order to lighten the caseload of probation officers supervising juveniles on exterior programs.

AFFECTED AGENCIES:


1. Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors
Response
2. Santa Barbara County Probation Department
Response

FINDING 3: The number of juveniles referred to the Probation Department by law enforcement agencies is increasing annually (see Appendix D). The Grand Jury would expect this trend to continue because juvenile offenders will have little respect for the juvenile justice system when they know that their chances of incarceration are minimal.

RECOMMENDATION 3: Same as Recommendation 1.

AFFECTED AGENCIES:


1. Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors
Response
2. Santa Barbara County Probation Department
Response

Los Prietos Boys Camp - Paradise Road/Star Route, Santa Barbara, CA 93105

OBSERVATIONS

Los Prietos is a 24-hour residential treatment center for male court wards between the ages of 13 - 18. Los Prietos is under the direction of the Santa Barbara County Probation Department, and is located in the Los Padres National Forest twenty miles north of Santa Barbara on land owned by the National Park Service and leased to Santa Barbara County.

According to statistics supplied by staff, the recidivism rate at Los Prietos has remained steady at approximately 50% to 60% for at least ten years with the dramatic exception of 1991. During that year a juvenile institutional officer was assigned to after-care responsibility and, as a result, recidivism at Los Prietos dropped to approximately 20%. At the end of the 12-month period, funding for the position was cut and the recidivism rate jumped back to 60%. In Departmental Overview, the Santa Barbara County Probation Department states that at Los Prietos, "special emphasis is put on law abiding behavior and adjusting to home and school once the program is completed."
1

A scholastic program is provided by the Santa Barbara County Department of Education.
Juveniles are required to attend classes five half-days per week. During the afternoon
hours, the juveniles are assigned to work crews within the camp.

A nurse is on duty five days a week. A physician visits once a week or as needed. Juveniles who have a communicable disease are housed in a purpose-built sickroom in the administrative office during working hours and returned to the dormitory at night. Boys with more serious communicable disease are sent home on furlough at the discretion of the Probation Staff and are returned to Los Prietos upon recovery.

Food is prepared and eaten in a modern facility. A full-time cook is aided by juvenile trusties.

Programs such as on-the-job training, vocational counseling, vocational training, individual counseling, group counseling, and family counseling are all offered at Los Prietos.

The staff at Los Prietos is headed by a Probation Manager who is assisted by a Probation Institutional Supervisor. In addition there are five Juvenile Institutional Officers III (JIO), twelve Juvenile Institutional Officers I and II, two clerk typists, one chef and two cooks. Two Marriage and Family Counselors from the County Mental Health Department work at Los Prietos full time.

The usual length of stay is six months with time off for good behavior. No one stays longer than nine months because the staff feels that if a boy is not ready to graduate after nine months, he would be more appropriately placed with the California Youth Authority.

According to Probation staff, 95% of the boys at Los Prietos are gang members, 85% are substance abusers and 75% to 85% have Hispanic last names but speak English as their first language.

FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

COMMENDATION:
Without exception, the Grand Jury found the staff working at Los Prietos provides a consistent, structured environment in order to encourage the boys in their care to make lifestyle changes that will allow a successful return to the community.

AFFECTED AGENCIES:

1. Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors
2. Santa Barbara County Probation Department

FINDING 4: The Probation Department is not currently living up to its claim of emphasizing the importance of adjustment to home and school following time spent at Los
Prietos. The recidivism rate could be lower, as reflected in the successful attention to after-care in 1991.

RECOMMENDATION 4: The Probation Department should immediately create and the Board of Supervisors should fund another Juvenile Institutional Officer staff position at Los Prietos Boys Camp. This JIO would have responsibility for the after-care of all graduates of Los Prietos beginning while each boy was still resident at Los Prietos. The officer would have intimate knowledge of each boy's case history, strengths and weaknesses and would be better able to counsel the juvenile as he makes the difficult transition back into his home environment.

AFFECTED AGENCIES:


1. Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors
Response
2. Santa Barbara County Probation Department
Response

 

APPENDIX A


Law Enforcement Referrals to Santa Barbara Probation Department-Juvenile Halls years 1990-19951
expressed as Percentage from South and North Counties
2

1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

South County

39

39

35

39

37

36

North County

61

61

65

61

63

64



Number of referrals from Sheriff's office to Santa Barbara Probation Department from 1990 to 1995
1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995
South County 1425 1549 1685 2088 2001 2041
North County 2243 2458 3104 3247 3367 3572



APPENDIX B




Average daily attendance in Santa Maria and Santa Barbara Juvenile Halls
Data supplied by the Santa Barbara County Probation Department : Jan 1993 to July 1996

1993 1994 1995 1996 (Projected)
# of North County Juveniles in both Juvenile Halls 471 544 597 939
# of South County Juveniles in both Juvenile Halls 308 291 286 682
% of North County to total 60% 71% 68% 58%





The total number of beds for the holding and treating of juvenile delinquents in Santa Barbara County is 76.
56 beds are located in Santa Barbara Juvenile Hall.
20 beds are located in Santa Maria Juvenile Hall.

APPENDIX C


The following are figures supplied to the Grand Jury from the Director of Juvenile Halls.

1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996
# Minors on Exterior Programs 380 427 445 513 586 757 1248
#Minors on Exterior Programs/
Total Annual Admissions
16% 16% 17% 21% 23% 33% 48%
Total Annual Admissions 2439 2763 2577 2391 2557 2304 2589
The above figures show the total population admitted to the two juvenile halls over the past 6 years.
Exterior Programs consist of minors placed in home on Home Supervision, House Arrest, and Electronic Monitoring.
In 1989 the ratios were 1 probation officer to 10 inmates on one of the above programs. It is now closer to 1 officer to 25 inmates (at home). In the meantime, the total number of juvenile misdemeanors has risen (as contrasted to adult misdemeanors and felonies), with an increasing number of violent offenders. The juvenile halls are seeing increasingly violent offenses, many committed by long-term gang members.


APPENDIX D





Juvenile referrals from law enforcement to Santa Barbara Probation Department for years 1990-1996
3

1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996
Number of Referrals 3668 4007 4789 5335 5368 5613 6807




D. JAILS


INTRODUCTION

The Grand Jury inspected three jail facilities in the county: Santa Barbara County Main Jail, Santa Maria Branch Jail and the Lompoc City Jail. According to the California Board of Corrections, the latter two are classified as Type I jails, while the Main Jail is a Type II facility. A Type I jail is defined as "a local detention facility used for the detention of persons for not more than 96 hours excluding holidays after bookings." A Type II jail is "a local detention facility used for the detention of persons pending arraignment, during trial, and upon a sentence of commitment."

OBSERVATIONS

Santa Barbara County Main Jail - 4436 Calle Real - Santa Barbara, CA 93110

At the time of the Grand Jury visit, the prison population was near the limit allowed by guidelines, 950 male prisoners and 99 female prisoners. According to the jail staff, this is a usual occurrence. The jail was originally constructed to house 820 inmates. The housing of additional inmates is accomplished by triple bunking and placing beds in day rooms. A court order was issued on February 13, 1989 by Superior Court Judge William Gordon calling for plans to address overcrowding, including the following statement: "The Court is of the opinion that this long term planning must be done with a view towards establishing suitable facilities in the North County."

Staff reports that there has been a large increase in the number of inmates who are illegal immigrants, an office and cell block have been designated specifically for the use of the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) in dealing with possible deportations. It is felt that this program can have a positive impact on our currently overcrowded jail situation. Jail personnel provide INS agents with a list of all inmates who claim a birthplace outside the USA. The INS officer investigates the legal status of these inmates. If an inmate is to be deported, the INS Agent arranges transportation to an INS facility.

The jail was extremely clean, well maintained and appropriately supervised.

Health care services at the jail are provided under a contract with Prison Health Services. Section 4c of the contract reads: "Provide AIDS/HIV testing as clinically indicated within current community standards of practice or upon inmate request." (emphasis added) The implementation of the Prison Health Services policy on AIDS/HIV testing, as done by County Health Care Services, is as follows: Inmates are evaluated under certain criteria which include intravenous drug use, same gender sexual activity, or a history of a sexually transmitted disease. If evaluation determines that an inmate is high risk or if the inmate
shows clinical evidence of the disease, the case is reviewed to determine if testing is indicated. Testing is not done if an inmate requests a test but does not meet the criteria.

There is a method for communication between prisoners and staff with respect to prisoner needs and problems. A written message is folded onto cell bars, picked up by a correctional officer and delivered to the appropriate staff person for action.

Santa Maria Branch Jail - 812 W. Foster Rd. - Santa Maria, CA 93455

Inmate labor is utilized for jail maintenance. Deficiencies noted in previous Grand Jury reports have been corrected. The air conditioning unit is in good working condition. The floor in the main holding area is being refinished by prison inmates. Plumbing problems are also consistently taken care of by inmates.

There is a separate cell block of sixteen beds housing inmates on a work furlough program. Wages earned may be used to pay penalties imposed by the court, child support, alimony or restitution.

A small office for the use of the Immigration and Naturalization Service was recently opened to facilitate INS work with illegal immigrants who are in custody.

Lompoc City Jail - 107 Civic Center Plaza - Lompoc, CA 93436

The facility in Lompoc has a capacity of twenty-three prisoners. The facility is a "U" shape, consisting of ten cells, two of which are for court holding. Four of the cells are normally used for felony detainees and the others are for misdemeanor inmates. There is also a booking room and an interview room.

Food preparation at the jail meets statutory requirements and medical attention is available at the nearby hospital.

Fingerprinting and photo identification necessary to the booking of prisoners are not digitized. The current system is a Polaroid-based mug shot system which does not interface with other county criminal justice agencies. Because of this inadequate system, detectives and support staff must perform more than 690 hours a year in manual searches and maintenance.

The jail is well managed, clean, and the staff is professional and forthright.


FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

COMMENDATION:
The Grand Jury commends the professionalism, caring attitude and forthrightness of each correctional officer with whom it came in contact.


AFFECTED AGENCIES:

1. Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors
2. Santa Barbara County Sheriff's Department
. 3. Lompoc City Council
4. Lompoc Police Department

FINDING 1: The Main Jail is consistently overcrowded.

RECOMMENDATION 1: New jail construction or expansion of the existing facilities must be addressed. This must be done in spite of the failure of Proposition 205. The Board of Supervisors should develop a funding plan and a realistic, meaningful time frame for each phase of the project.

AFFECTED AGENCY:


1. Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors (Also see sheriff's response)
Response


FINDING 2: The use of inmate labor at the Santa Maria Branch Jail saves money for the taxpayers.

RECOMMENDATION 2: This program should be continued.

AFFECTED AGENCY:


1. Santa Barbara County Sheriff's Department
Response

FINDING 3: The offices of the Immigration and Naturalization Service at the Santa Barbara Main Jail and the Santa Maria Branch Jail are useful. They are helpful in addressing overcrowding. When deportation is known to be determinate and immediate, it can also serve as a helpful deterrent to crime.

RECOMMENDATION 3: This program should be continued.

AFFECTED AGENCY:


1. Santa Barbara County Sheriff's Department
Response

FINDING 4: Fingerprinting and photo identification methods at the Lompoc Jail are outdated.

RECOMMENDATION 4: State-of-the-art equipment should be installed. The Lompoc City Council should provide funding for the Police Department to purchase a
basic digital imaging photo and fingerprinting system which would interface with other county criminal justice agencies.

AFFECTED AGENCIES:

1. Lompoc City Council
Response
2. Lompoc Police Department
Response

FINDING 5: AIDS/HIV testing is done only if individuals are determined to be in a high risk category or show clinical evidence of disease.

RECOMMENDATION 5: The Prison Health Services contract should be implemented as written. In addition to the above reasons, AIDS/HIV testing should also be performed upon inmate request.

AFFECTED AGENCY:


1. Santa Barbara County Health Care Services
Response


AFFECTED AGENCIES California Penal Code Section 933(c) requires that comments to the Grand Jury Findings and Recommendations be made in writing to the presiding judge of the superior court within 60 days by all affected agencies except governing bodies, which are allowed 90 days. In accordance with Section 933.05, the responding person or entity shall indicate the following:
1) The respondent agrees with the finding.
2) The respondent disagrees wholly or partially with the finding, in which case
the respondent shall specify the portion that is disputed and include an explanation.
3) The recommendation has been implemented, with a summary of the
implemented action.
4) The recommendation has not been implemented, but will be in the future with a
time frame.
5) The recommendation requires further analysis, with an explanation and a time frame. This time frame shall not exceed six months from the date of the publication of the grand jury report.
6) The recommendation will not be implemented because it is not warranted or is not reasonable, with an explanation.


The Grand Jury requests that all responses be submitted on a 3 inch computer disk along with the printed response.


1 Santa Barbara County Probation Department - Departmental Overview. (The Santa Barbara County Probation Department: 1996) 10.
2 alifornia Department of Justice, Criminal Statistics Center
South County (Santa Barbara. Goleta, Carpinteria & Montecito -North County - Santa Maria, Lompoc, & Santa Ynez Valley
3 California Bureau of Criminal Statistics

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